Sunday, September 11, 2016

Pension for a Retiring Vicereinne

I was pleased to be asked to work on the scroll for the retiring Vicereinne, Johanne i Visby.  I did the words and the calligraphy; my usual co-conspirator +Stacey Rothrock Steinfeld did the lovely illuminated capital.





Kenric and Avelina, King and Queen of the East, to our faithful Johanne i Visby, greetings and love.  Since all things which are done may be cut off by process of long time or the trouble of ambiguity or destruction of every kind of oblivion, we have commended to the present page our will in this matter.  In memory of the good and diligent service you have done as Vicereinne of Ostgardr, and willing and wishing that you should maintain yourself hereafter in the manner and station fitting your merit, we do hereby grant and endow unto you the fees, rents, profits, revenues, and gainage[1] from the lands of Brokenbridge, to hold the same hereafter freely, tranquilly, fully, wholly, honourably, well and in peace, for the term of your life.  That the present endowment may be held firm by all our successors, we have had the present page drawn up and have fortified it with the authority of our ensigns manual upon 10 September in the fifty-first year of the Society.


[1] Profits derived from agriculture

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Pennsic 45: Riling up the Rapier Champions

When I became Queen's Bard, I was told that one of the things I could do as Bard was rile up the Champions at Pennsic.  The Unbelted rattan champions have their own thing going with Mistress Aneleda, and the Archery Champions never told me whether they wanted to be riled up, but I did a Thing for the Rapier Champions.

I started with Henry V's speech before the walls of Harfleur from Shakespeare's play of the same name (Act III, scene 1):

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead.
In peace there's nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility:
But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
Then imitate the action of the tiger;
Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,
Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage;
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;
Let pry through the portage of the head
Like the brass cannon; let the brow o'erwhelm it
As fearfully as doth a galled rock
O'erhang and jutty his confounded base,
Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide,
Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit
To his full height. On, on, you noblest English.
Whose blood is fet from fathers of war-proof!
Fathers that, like so many Alexanders,
Have in these parts from morn till even fought
And sheathed their swords for lack of argument:
Dishonour not your mothers; now attest
That those whom you call'd fathers did beget you.
Be copy now to men of grosser blood,
And teach them how to war. And you, good yeoman,
Whose limbs were made in England, show us here
The mettle of your pasture; let us swear
That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not;
For there is none of you so mean and base,
That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
Straining upon the start. The game's afoot:
Follow your spirit, and upon this charge
Cry 'God for Harry, England, and Saint George!'


And then I worked mischief to it to make it more resonant for SCA purposes and to take out things that wouldn't be meaningful to SCAdians, like the "grosser blood" of those not nobly born.   I hope that Shakespeare isn't rolling in his grave.

Here's what I came up with, and croaked out with failing voice to the Champions on Sunday afternoon:

In peace, there's nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility:
But when the blast of war blows in our ears
Then imitate the actions of the Tyger;
Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,
Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage;
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;
Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide;
Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit
To your full height.  On, on you noblest tygers
Whose blood is fet from fathers of war-proof!
Fathers that, like so many Alexandres [hair flip]
have in these parts from morn 'til even fought.
Go face now the folk in Dragon's red
And teach them how to war!
    And you, brave tygers, 
Whose limbs were in Eastrealm made, show us here
the mettle of your rapiers, which I doubt not.
For there is none of you so mean and base 
That hath not war-like lustre in your eyes.
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips
Straining upon the start.  The game's afoot!
Follow your spirit and upon this charge:
For Avelina, Kenric and the East!




Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Silver Crescent Text for Tanczos Ilona

Tanczos Ilona (first name = Ilona because Hungarian) has a Hungarian persona, and was due to receive a well-deserved Silver Crescent for her hard work, including work at Herald's Point.  I collaborated with Palotzi Marti on a period text for her scroll, which the awesome and amazing Marti put into 16th cen. Hungarian.

The original English:

By Kenric the King; by Avelina the Queen.  So that those things, which have been piously and prudently disposed by us, not be changed by men in the course of time, but remain stable and strong perpetually, we make known to all in the present and the future, that Tanczos Ilona has well, diligently, honorably and faithfully served our realm of the East.  In grateful affirmation thereof, we do hereby give, grant and by the present charter confirm unto the said Ilona admission in to the Order of the Silver Crescent, to have and hold the rights, endowments, easements and privileges of the same as freely and fully as any other member of the aforenamed Order.  And we do further give, endow and Grant unto the said Ilona the following Arms:  Per pale purpure and argent, six periwinkles, two, two and two, counterchanged.  In perpetual memory and inviolable confirmation of this our grant and endowment, we have caused the present page to be written and fortified by the protection of our ensigns manual, and to be read before our court of honest and upright men.  Enacted at Southern Regional War Camp in the Barony of Carillion, on the Saturday following the feast of Saint Medard, in the fifty-first year of the Society.


16th century Hungarian translation by Palotzi Marti:

Kenric kyraly w felssege es Avelina kiraly azzon ŏ felsyge. Hogy azon dolgokat, ammelyeket kegiesen es kereol tekintwen elrendeltewnk, maas emberek neh waltoztassak az wdŏ mulasaval, hanem megh maradgianak tartósan ees ereossen az wdeonek vegezteig, ezennel tudatjuk myndenkyuel, ky e sorokat olwassa mosth vaj a yeweben, hogy Tanczos Ilona zorgalmatoson, bechiulletesen, es hwsegesen zolgalia nap keleti byrodalmunkat. Haladassunk ki hirdettese es tudatasa vegett ezen okleuelonkuel beh jkthattiuk Ilonat az Ezwst Sarlo rendbe, es meg eressythetthyuk mynden azval jaro zabadsagat ees kedwezmeniet, melyeket egy forma ereowel ees zabadossagval giakorolhat, mynth minden tarsa az meg newezett rendben.Thowabba az alabbi czymert donatoljuk es adomanniozzuk nekye: biborral es ezwstel hasytoth mezeon keeth ozlopban hat theli zöld vyrag waltakozo zinben. Es hogy a felyol irot donationk eoreok es serthetetlen maraggyon a wylag emlekezeteben ezen zokat bochiatiuk papirosra es meg eressythetthyuk az my kez jegyeunkkel, hogy olwastathattassek uduarunkban igaz es egyenes emberek eleoth. El rendeltetett Carillion mayorunkban a deli warmegek hadi taboraban, Medardus napja wthan walo Zombaton az ewthven egyedik ezthendeoben.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

Scots OTC text for Rory MacLellan

I don't know this gentleman, but his contact people asked that the scroll text be "Scottish."  So, early 16th century Scots it is.   I got to calligraph this one my very own self.  Of course, I foolishly failed to take a picture of it.  Perhaps +christin nosenchuk  can contact Rory and get a picture of the finished product?

Kenric, King of the Eest, and Avelina the Quene, to our right traisty Rory MacLellan, greetings.  Wheras diveris of our subjectis have by ther severall petitiones humbly besought us that you should be indewit with sych honoures, dignities, proffites and priviledges as becumis ane fichter of skill and excellence; and wheras We agrie that you are skilfull, stowt and hardy in the artes of battell; we do thairfor, by these our presents lettiris, insese, indow and indote you, for all tymecomeing, as a member of the Ordoure off the Tygeris Combattant.  So that the seid indewment and dotatione in sall hald the force and strenthe of perfyte securitie, We decretis that the beforesaid be declaired in publik placis and recordit in wrytting for perpetuitie.  Subscrived with our signis manuale upon 11 June A.S. 51.

Friday, June 10, 2016

With apologies to Shakespeare

And thus I shall rile up the troups for the coming hostilities:

In peace there's nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility:
But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
Then imitate the action of the tiger  Tyger;
Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,
Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage;
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;
Let pry through the portage of the head
Like the brass cannon; let the brow o'erwhelm it
As fearfully as doth a galled rock
O'erhang and jutty his confounded base,
Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide,
Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit
To his full height. On, on, you noblest English Tygers,
Whose blood is fet from fathers of war-proof!
Fathers that, like so many Alexanders,
Have in these parts from morn till even fought
And sheathed their swords for lack of argument:
Dishonour not your mothers; now attest
That those whom you call'd fathers did beget you.
Be copy now to men of grosser blood,
And teach them how to war. And you, good yeoman,
Whose limbs were in Eastrealm made made in England, show us here
The mettle of your pasture; let us swear
That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not;
For there is none of you so mean and base,
That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
Straining upon the start. The game's afoot:
Follow your spirit, and upon this charge

Cry 'God for Harry, England, and Saint George!' “For Avelina, Kenric and the East!”


It is, of course, Henry V, Act III, scene 1 before the gates of Harfleur

Sunday, April 24, 2016

More notes on Scots name construction

Putting this data here for reference in SCA names commentary.  


(1)  The use of Mak- and Mac- or Mc- interchangeably

The same 1466 Scots-language record refers to a man as Finlaw Makcowloche of Torhousis, and his two sons as George Mccowloche and Norman Mccowloche.


(2)  Women using Mac- style bynames

Maryeone Makmorane, lady of Blar' (1476).

Marioune McQuharge (1493)

Effric McDowelle (1483)



(3)  Scots women not using their husband's surnames

Alexander Makke and Elizabethe Inglis', his spouse  (1479)

Elisabethe Rothven', the spouse of umqhile Patrik Donaldson' (1473)

Johne Mowbray and Marione Hoppringil, his spouse (1473)

Marioune McQuharge, the spous of umquhile Fergus McDowell  (1493)

Robert Logane of Coitfeld and Marioune Carkettle, his spous (1528)


Except when they did:

Alise Hopp[ri]ngill, the spous of umquhile Thomas Hopp[ri]ngill  (1493)

(Use of different surnames by husbands and wives is by far the general rule).

Thursday, April 14, 2016

The spelling "Macleod"

Thanks to the enduring popularity of Highlander (movie and TV series), forms of "MacLeod" are among the most common requests made by submitters.  Our documentation for this particular spelling existing in period has been a little shaky.  But, I've now found it in the papers of Henry VIII of England:

28 July.
R. O.
St. p., v.477.       Commission of Donald lord of the Isles and earl of Ross, with the advice of his barons and council of the Isles (viz., "Hector Maclane, lord of Doward, Jhone Macallister, (fn. n4) capitane of Clanrannald, Rore Macleod of Lewis, Alexr Macleod Dumveggane, Mwrdoch Maclane of Lochbowy, Angus Maconill, brudir germane to James Maconill, Allane Maclane of Torloske, brudir germane to ye lord Maclan, Archibald Maconill capitane of Clanhustoun, Alexr Mackeyn of Ardnamurchane, Jhone Maclane of Coll, Gilleganan Macneill of Barray, Edwin Mackynnan of Straquhordill, Jhone Macquore of Wlway, Jhoun Maclane of Ardgor, Alexr Bannaldsoun of Glengerre, Angus Rannaldsoun of Knwdeort, Donald Maclane of Kengerrloch") to Rore Macallister, bp. elect of the Isles and dean of Morwarne, and Mr. Patrick Maclane, brother germane to Lord Maclane, bailze of Ycomkill and justice clerk of the South Isles, to deal with Henry VIII. as shall be commanded them by Matthew earl of Lennox, "secund persoun" of the realm of Scotland. The lord of the Isles and his barons have subscribed their names with "hand at the pen" because they "cannot write," and the said lord has given the commissioners his own signet, to be used as Lennox shall command. Witnesses, Patrik Colquhoun of Pemwnt, Wateir Macfarlan of Ardlys, Sir Archibald McGillevray, vicar of Killane, Mr. Jhonn Carsuell, notaries public, with others. Names subscribed, in two different handwritings, each followed by the words "with my hand at the pen."

'Henry VIII: July 1545, 26-31', in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 20 Part 1, January-July 1545, ed. James Gairdner and R H Brodie (London, 1905), pp. 632-685. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/letters-papers-hen8/vol20/no1/pp632-685  (emphasis added)

For those interested in the more common period spellings, they include:

McCloid (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1545/9/2/8)   --> MacCloid for registration

McCloid' (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1506/2/3) --> MacCloide for registration

McCloyd (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1587/7/70) --> MacCloyd for registration

McCloyd' (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1531/14) --> MacCloyde for registration

McCloydd (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1545/9/28/58) --> MacCloydd for registration

MacCleud (http://www.rps.ac.uk/mss/1587/7/70)