Sunday, July 15, 2018

Doroga's Maunche Text

Doroga's lady requested that we try to find a way to work a particular quote from Cervantes into the text.  Can you figure out what that quote is?

I did not know who would be reading this, so I did not get too creating with 16th century spelling.

Brennan Rey and Caoilfhionn Reyna to our good and gentle Doroga Voronin, greetings and all good of the goods.  Noble persons of exalted lineage have brought us word of your singular excellence.  It is said that, if one would view in equal balance the shining Phoebus and the blood-stained Mars, look to Doroga, in whom the one and the other are not separate.  In him, both pen and sword are manifest with such discretion, art and dexterity that he has made of bladework both science and art.  We are by these words greatly moved and being so moved, we do now, of our especial grace, certain science, and mere motion, give and grant and by these presents for us, our heirs and successors give, grant and by the present charter confirm unto you the status, estate and renown of a companion of the Order of the Maunche, with all rights, privileges, prerogatives, commodities, jurisdictions, royalties, franchises, and preeminences attending thereupon.  And we do further grant unto you the right to bear Arms in the form following: Per pale purpure and vert, on a chief argent a raven displayed sable.  And we do further instruct and command you to bear upon your person hereafter and in all times coming the badge and signacle of the Order of the Maunche so that the love and esteem we bear you be made manifest to all persons of whatever estate.  For the greater security and stability of the aforesaid, know that we have laid our hands upon the holy relics of our Realm and sworn to keep, observe and fulfill all of the within promises, and each part of parcel of them, really and in fact, renouncing all deception, mental reservation, and subterfuge.  Witness ourselves, at Malagentia, upon 14 July, in the fifty-third year of the Society.

Anastasia's Augmentation of Arms


The spelling is accurate for c. 1510 and the text was inspired by multiple letters of Henry VIII to Cardinal Wolsey thanking him for his service and urging him to take a vacation.   And, of course, there are footnotes.

Brennan the Kyng and Caoilfhionn the Queen to Anastasia Gutane, right trustie, and righte welbelovid wee greete you well.  We recommande you with all owr hart to the peple of the Easte and the Known Worlde, and thanke yow for the grette paynes and labour that yow do dayly take in the bysyness and maters of the Societee.  And we commande, desyre and instruct yow to take summe pastyme and comfort from yowr labour[1], to the intent that yow may longer endure to serve us and our Reaulme.  Surly yow have so substancyally orderyd maters wythyn yowr sphere that lytil or nothyng can be addyd; indede we are well contendyd with what order yow have mayde in all maters to whych yow sett yowr hands, shewinge therbie yowr great love and loyalltie towardes the Crowne and peple of the Easte, which wee accept most thanckfullie from yowr handes.  And further, desyryng, wantynge and wyshyng that the valew, esteeme and tendershippe[2] in whiche yow are beholden be made both perficte and manyfest to all persouns of whateuere estate, Wee have theerfore thoughte it meete and behoveful[3] to give, graunt and bie thees presents lettirs convaye untow yow an Augmentacioun of Armes, with all circumstaunt[4] benefetes, avauntage, profits, pryvyleges and honnours, and we instruct and commaunde our heraulds to attende fourthewyth to þe circumstauncis of the sayd Augmentacioun.  Given under our signet at our mannor of Malagentia the 14th daie of July in the 53rd yere of the Societee.


[1]  Something we have said to Anastaia a lot  :-)

[2] tendershippe = favor, regard, esteem.

[3]  behoveful = requisite, necessary, pertinent, appropriate, proper

[4]  circumstaunt = accompanying

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

County Text for Matilde de Cadenet

Now-Countess Matilde asked me to do her County text to fit a Russian icon-style scroll.   I generally don't like to repeat sources if possible, but Matilde really liked one of my previous Russian-inspired pieces (for Khioniya Ryseva's Silver Crescent), so I broke my usual rule and re-used the intro.  Sometimes you just gotta give the people what they like  :-)

And yes, this is a fairly long one.  Again, sometimes you just gotta give the people what they like.


Brennan and Caoilfhionn, Imperator et Imperatrix, to our servant Matilde de Cadenet, greetings.  The authority of the Crown of the East had its origin in Maragorn and Adrienne, founders of Our line, and the great Cariadoc, who declared war upon himself, and the valiant great Darius and Roxanne of blessed memory, who led Eastern armies against the sons of the Dragon, then it passed to the avengers of wrongs, our ancestors, the praiseworthy great Kenric and Avelina, who obtained great victories upon the fields of AEthelmearc, and to our father the wise Emperor Ivan, until it reached us, the humble scepter-bearers of the Eastern Empire. Here follows the command of the orthodox, truly Eastern Majesties:

Forasmuch as you have shown yourself to be of singular and remarkable worth; and having taken counsel from the boyar and boyar kinsmen of our Realm and having heard abundant and multifold praise and of your deeds and your character; and having by evidence of our own eyes avouched your quality; We do now by these present Imperial and unassailable letters bestow upon you the sign and insignia of a Countess, along with all rights, privileges, immunities, honors, and endowments of that rank.

If anyone, be a neighbour or a stranger, no matter what his condition or power, though any kind of wile, should attempt to do any act of violence contrary to this our Imperial edict, let God remove him from the land of the living and wipe out his name from the book of life, let him experience in his own body the torments of future damnation, unless he come to his senses and hail you as honorably excellent and excellently honorable Countess.

 Written in our great Eastern Empire, in the famous Shire of Quintavia, on the steps of our Imperial threshold, in the fifty-second year from the creation of the Society, the 7th day of April. 

Maunche Text for Chatricam Meghanta

Chatricam Meghanta has been doing amazing work in medieval Indian poetry.   For her Maunche (East Kingdom grant-level arts award) text, I did not want to do a Western European legal text.

I'm not a poet.   Trying to replicate Tamil poetry, her speciality, seemed a dicey proposition -- so easy to do it completely wrong.   I went back through Megha's own research pages to see if anything really sang to me.  I read a lot of Tamil poetry as well as other medieval Islamic poetry that Megha had posted or referenced.   I began to circle around pieces from the poets Hafez and Rumi, both medieval Persians rather than Indians, but both "poets of the spirit" that I know have great meaning to Megha.

In particular, this poem by Hafez kept insisting that it "belonged" to Megha.

CAST ALL YOUR VOTES FOR DANCING
I know the voice of depression still calls to you.
I know those habits that can ruin your life still send their invitations.
But you are with the Friend now and look so much stronger.
You can stay that way and even bloom!
Keep squeezing drops of the Sun from your prayers and work and music
And from your companions' beautiful laughter.
Keep squeezing drops of the Sun from the sacred hands and glance of your Beloved
And, my dear, from the most insignificant movements of your own holy body.
Learn to recognize the counterfeit coins that may buy you just a moment of pleasure,
But then drag you for days like a broken man behind a farting camel.
You are with the Friend now.
Learn what actions of yours delight Him, what actions of yours
Bring freedom and Love.
Whenever you say God's name, dear pilgrim, my ears wish my head was missing
So they could finally kiss each other and applaud all your nourishing wisdom!
O keep squeezing drops of the Sun from your prayers and work and music
And from your companions' beautiful laughter and from the most insignificant
movements of your own holy body.
Now, sweet one,
Be wise.
Cast all your votes for Dancing!


The imagery of performance as the act of "squeezing drops of the Sun" was compelling.   My source was chosen.

I set out to write something with the "look and feel" of the Tamil poetry that Megha performs and using Hafez's splendid imagery.  My length was limited to fit how the scribe wanted to use the text, so most of the text ended up being devoted to getting the work of the SCA award process done.  But that is all to the good because I am not naturally a poet and I think more words would have revealed that weakness quite clearly.

I know that Megha likes it, so I succeeded in that most important aspect.  I'm still a little disappointed that I couldn't get the "ears kissing each other in joy at her words" imagery in here, though.


O poet, keep squeezing drops of the Sun from your prayers and work and music and from your companions' beautiful laughter.
O poet, your name is spoken the halls of the wise and the King and Queen would do you honor for your golden words.
O poet, you should wear this Maunche upon your person in all the days coming.
These words were commanded by Brennan and Caoilfhionn, King and Queen, upon 7 April at Quintavia.

Writ for the Laurel

I wanted to do something a little different than the basic bare-bones Writ for this one.   I looked to a couple of late 13th century examples of summonses to Parliament that laid out the intended purposes of the Parliament before demanding the attendance of the person addressed.  As East Kingdom Crowns generally have Order meetings at Pennsic, this model fit the purpose nicely.  Plus, because I'm always a fan of scrolls that threaten someone, I liked the command to come prepared "with full and sufficient power" to do the necessary business.



Brennan Imperator and Caoilfhionn Imperatrix to Jean-Paul Ducasse. Since we intend to have a consultation and meeting with the principal persons of our kingdom with regard to the constitution of our Order of the Laurel, on that account, we have commanded the said Order to be with us in August at the Pennsic War to consider, ordain and do as may be necessary for the proper continuance thereof; We therefore strictly require you to attend upon us at the aforesaid place and time, to hear the counsel of the aforesaid Order and such other notable persons as shall be in attendance, the task being before you to answer the question whether you will accept elevation to the aforenamed Order.  You should attend upon us on the date abovenamed prepared with full and sufficient power to answer the question so that the aforesaid business shall not remain unfinished in any way.   Witness at Quintavia upon April 7 in the fifty-second year.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Frankish Given Names from the Cartulary of Montier-en-Der (666 - 999 C.E.)


Introduction

            The Abbey of Montier-en-Der was a monastic house in northeastern France (modernly, it is located in the Haute-Marne department).  The Cartulary of Montier-en-Der is a collection of Latin legal documents relating to the Abbey compiled in the early 12th century.  An annotated copy of the Cartulary of Montier-en-Der, edited by Constance Brittain Bouchard, was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2004.  I am relying on this edition for my data.  Bouchard did not modernize or normalize the spellings.  She also preserved some of the scribal abbreviations.

Notes on the Transcription

            In the transcribed Cartulary, u often stands in for v.  Whether a particular letter u should be read as v depends on the context.  For instance, Aua is probably Ava, but the u in Bertulfus makes sense only as a u.  Where it is possible to identify when the u should be read as a v, I have indicated that in the header.
            Several of the documents found in the Cartulary are forgeries, usually created significantly later than the date on the document itself.  Where the forgery was prepared within period, I have dated the names in the document to the likely date of the forgery.

Using the Data

The source documents are written in Latin.  As a result, not all spellings found in the text are registerable name spellings for SCA purposes.  Latin spelling varies depending on whether the given name appears as the subject or object of the original sentence.  Only the nominative forms can be used to create given names. 

The bolded header forms are the most common nominative forms of the given names.  Where the nominative form is not found in any of the texts, I have extrapolated the most likely nominative form based on other period examples. 

The forms under the heading are those actually found in the texts, including certain variant spellings.  Variant nominative forms are marked as (n.). 

Genitive (possessive) forms are marked as (g).  Genitive forms are of interest because they can be used to create patronymic surnames using the following patterns:

[male given name] + filius (“son of”) + [genitive father’s name]

[female given name] + filia (“daughter of”) + [genitive father’s name] 

The numbers in the second column of each entry are the dates of documents in which the name is found.

For submitters who do not want to use the Latin forms, in most cases, the vernacular form can be identified by dropping the –us from the end of male names.  For example, the probable vernacular form of Amalricus is Amalric.

A.  Male Given Names
Aaron
      Aaron                          late 10th century
Abilo
      Abilonis (g.)               late 10th century
Adalacrus
      Adalacri (g.)               843
Adalbero
Adalbero                     980
Adalberonis (g.)         980
Adalbertus
      Adalberto                    693
Adalgarius
      Adalgarius                  867/875
Ademarus
      Ademaro                     876-77
Adremarus
      Adremari (g.)              967
Adroldus
Adroldus                     971, 991
Adroldi (g.)                 late 10th century
Adso
Adso                            971, c. 980
Adsonis (g.)                967, 968
Adzo (n.)                     967
Æneas
Æneas                         845
Agifredus
      Agifredus                    867
Agilus
      Agilus                         867
Agristius
      Agristius                     971
Aimo
      Aimo                           991
Aimoldus
      Aimoldus                    971
Ainherus
      Ainheri (g.)                 late 10th century
Airardus
      Airardi (g.)                 992 – c. 1000
Albricus
      Albrici (g.)                  967
Albuinus
      Albuinus                     992 – c. 1000
Aledrammus
      Aledrammo                 876-77
Alegrerius[1]
      Alegrerius                   991
Alledulfus
Alledulfus                   768-800
Alleolfi (g.)                760
Alo
      Aloni                           693
Altmarus
Altmarus                     845
Altmaro                      845, 857
Amalricus
      Amalrici (g.)               675
Andelonus
      Andeloni (g.)              760, 768-800, 851
Angelramnus
      Angelramni (g.)          967
Archemfridus
Archemfridi (g.)         late 10th century
Archemfrido               late 10th century
Archemfridus             late 10th century
Archenoldus
      Archenoldi (g.)           843
Archerius
      Archeri (g.)                 828
Arembertus
      Aremberti (g.)            857, 992 – c. 1000
Arierus
      Arieri (g.)                   828
Arnaudus
      Arnaudo                      851
Arnulfus
Arnulfi (g.)                 992 – c. 1000
Arnulfus                      980
Artmannus
      Artmanni (g.)              857
Artuisus
      Artuisi (g.)                  857
Atelanus
      Atelani (g.)                 666, 675
Baiolus
      Baioli (g.)                   992 – c. 1000
Basinus
      Basino                         693
Bercharius
Bercharii (g.)              666
Berchario                    675, 693
Bercharius                  666, 675. 685, 693, 857, 971
Berengerus
Berengerii (g.)            967, 992 – c. 1000
Berengerus                  992 – c. 1000
Bernefridus
      Bernefridus                 857
Beroldus
      Beroldi (g.)                 971
Bertoendus
      Bertoendo                   693
Bertrannus
      Bertranni (g.)              992 – c. 1000
Bertulfus
      Bertulfi (g.)                828
Blesinus
      Blesini (g.)                  851
Blitharius
      Blitharii (g.)               857
Boso
Boso                            876, late 10th century
Bosone                        968
Bosonis (g.)                851
Bouo
      Bouonis (g.)                843
Childericus
Childerici (g.)             675, 693
Childerico                   666, 675
Chilpericus (n.)          685
Clodoueus (Clodoveus/Clodoveo)
Clodouei (g.)              693
Clodoueo                    693
Clodoueus                   693
Constantius
      Constantii (g.)            980
      Constantius                 971
Deocadius
      Deocadius                   666
Deodatus
      Deodati (g.)                992 – c. 1000
Dudo
      Dudonis (g.)                992 – c. 1000
Durandus
      Durandus                    827
Ebo
      Ebo                              827
Eirbertus
      Eirberti (g.)                 768-800
Elbrant
      Elbrant                        828
Eldebertus
      Eldebertus                   971
Eldeuualt
      Eldeuualt                    828
Eldricus
      Eldricus                      991
Elisierdus
      Elisierdus                    991
Emo
      Emonis (g.)                 828
Ermenaldus
      Ermenaldus                 971
Ermenardus
      Ermendardus              991
Ermengaudus
      Ermengaudus              991
Floterus
      Floteri (g.)                  828
Floutgis
      Floutgis                       828
Fluderig
      Fluderig                      828
Folchricus
      Folchricus                   859
Fredugisus
      Fredugisi (g.)              827
Fulco
      Fulco                           991
      Fulconis (g.)               late 10th century
Garnerius
      Garnerius                    991
      Warnerius (n.)            971
Gautfin
      Gautfin                        828
Genulfus
      Genulfi (g.)                 857
Gerherus
      Gerherus                     857
Gibuinus
      Gibuinus                     980
Gilduinus
      Gilduini (g.)                980
Giraudus
      Giraudi (g.)                 851
      Giraudus                     851
Girmarus
      Girmari (g.).               828
Girouus
      Girouum                     828
Gislaudus
      Gislaudus                    991
Gislebertus
      Gislebertus                 857
Gislefridus
      Gislefridi (g.)             843
Giso
      Giso                            971
Godelinus
      Godelini (g.)               867/875
Godo
      Godo                           876-77
Goduinus
      Goduinus                    971
Golmarus
      Golmarus                    760
Guaderannus
      Guaderannus               991
Gualo
      Gualo                          971
Guanuinus
      Guanuinus                   991
Hadricus
      Hadricus                     991
Harduinus
      Harduini (g.)               828, 857
Harmarus
      Harmari (g.)                666
Hauto
      Haudo (n.)                   828, 832
      Hauto                          815, 827
Heribertus
      Heriberti (g.)              968, 980
      Heriberto                    968, 980
      Heribertus                   968, 980
Heruieus
      Heruiei (g.)                 980
Hilduinus
      Hilduini (g.)                666
Hisimbertus
      Hisimbertus                832
Hostoldus
      Hostoldi (g.)               857
Hugo
      Hugone                       991
      Hugonis (g.)                857
Hunrogus
      Hunrogi (g.)                857
Ingelbertus
      Ingelberti (g.).            c. 980
Karolus
      Karoli (g.)                   845, 857, 859, 867/875, 876-77
      Karolo                         768-800, 851, 857, 859, 876, 968
      Karolus                       845, 857, 867/875, 859, 876-77, 968
Lantbertus
      Lantberti (g.)              968, c.980
Lantboldus
      Lantboldi (g.)             857
Ledesus
      Ledesi (g.)                  760
Leodegarius
      Leodegarii (g.)            666, 675
Letericus
      Letericus                     991
      Letrico                        876-77
Lotharius
      Lotharii (g.)                827, 980
      Lothario                      967, 968
      Lotharius                    827, 980
Lucdouuicus (Ludovicus)
      Lucdouuici (g.)           815, 827, 832, 845, 857, 867/875
      Lucdouuico                 828
      Lucdouuicus               815, 827, 832
      Ludouici                     late 10th century
Madalgarius
      Madalgario                 693
      Madelgarii (g.)           851
Maddeurertus
      Maddeurerti (g.)         843
Madianus
      Madiani (g.)                857
Mainerus
      Mainerus                     991
Manasses
      Manasses                    991
Merulfus
      Merulfus                     857
Milo
      Milo                            971
Mummolenus
      Mummoleni                666
Narbrannus
      Narbranni (g.)             768-800
Niuardus (Nivardus)
      Niuardi (g.)                 666, 980
Niuo (Nivo)
      Niuonis (g.)                967, 992 – c. 1000
Odelherus
      Odelheri (g.)               late 10th century
Odo
      Odo                             991
      Odonis (g.)                  980, 992 – c. 1000
Otgerus
      Otgeri (g.)                   980
Pardulus
      Pardulo                       857, late 10th century
      Pardulus                      857
Pipinus
      Pipini (g.)                   815
      Pipino                         760
      Pipinus                        693
Ragenardus
      Ragenardi (g.)             late 10th century
Ragenarius
      Ragenarii (g.)             857, 967
Raimfridus
      Raimfridi (g.)             828
Raimhardus
      Raimhardi (g.)            828
Rainoldus
      Rainoldi (g.)               992 – c. 1000
Rainerus
      Rainerus                      991
Remigius
      Remigii (g.)                760, 768-800
Reolus
      Reoli (g.)                    675
Ribaldus
      Ribaldi (g.)                 992 – c. 1000
Richardus
      Richardi (g.)               968, 980
Riculfus
      Riculfi (g.)                  828
Rigobertus
      Rigoberto                    693
Risus
      Risi (g.)                       857
Riuuerus
      Riuueri (g.)                 843
Rodulfus
      Rodulfi (g.)                 968, c. 980, 992 – c. 1000
Rogerus
      Rogeri (g.)                  828
Rohencus
      Rohenci (g.)                843
Romoldus
      Romoldi (g.)               967, 992 – c. 1000
Rotbertus
      Robertus                     971, 991
Rotfridus
      Rotfridus                     843
Rotgarius
      Rotgarii (g.)                851
Rotlandus
      Rotlandi                      late 10th century
      Rotlandus                    late 10th century
Ruerus
      Rueri (g.)                    late 10th century
Seiardus
      Seiardi (g.)                  992 – c. 1000
Sigebaldus
      Sigebaldi (g.)              768 - 800
Sigibertus
      Sigiberti (g.)               980
Somnassus
      Somnassi (g.)              760
      Sunnasii (g.)               768-800
Stephanus
      Stephani (g.)               992 – c. 1000
      Stephano                     693
Tebaudus
      Tebaudus                    991
Teodericus
      Teoderici (g.)              968
Teudalt
      Teudalt                        828
Teudo
      Teudo                          991
Vfonis (Ufonis)
      Vfonis                         828
Vuaimeris/Waimeris
      Vuaimeris                   693
Vualbertus/Walbertus
      Vualbertus                  late 10th century
      Vualberti (g.)              late 10th century
Vualfridus/Walfridus
      Vualfridus                   967
Vualterus/Walterus
      Vualteri (g.)                980, 992 – c. 1000
Vualtildis/Waltildis
      Vualtildis                    693
Vuatso/Wazo
      Vuatsonis (g.)             980
Vuibertus/Wibertus
      Vuiberti (g.)                980
Vuicardus/Wicardus
      Vuicardi (g.)               992 – c. 1000
Vuido/Wido
      Vuidonis (g.)              980
Vuilelmus/Wilelmus
      Vuilelmi                     980
Vuilericus/Wilericus
      Vuilerici (g.)               857
Vuilerus/Wilerus/Willerus
      Vuileri (g.)                  967
Vulfaudus
      Vulfaudi (g.)               675
      Vulfaudus                   859


B.  Female Given Names
Aua (Ava)
      Auæ                             857
Auregia   
      Auregiæ                      857
Emma
      Emma                         980
Erlesenna
      Erlesennæ                   760
Foedagia
      Foedagiam                  851
Gisla
      Gislæ                           857
Huneriana
      Huneriana                   857, late 10th century
Tetca
Tetce                         857
Tidiliana
Tidiliana                     end of 10th century



[1]  It is unclear whether this is a unique name or a misspelling of Alegregius, a name appearing in later documents.